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Jordyn Bonds is co-founder and CEO of TallyLab. I got to know of her after my interview with James Christie. When I saw that she had given a talk about the web’s energy (in)efficiency I had to speak to her as the carbon footprint of the web an elephant in the tech industry’s room that is largely ignored.

Our conversation touched on a number of issues including diversity, privacy, and how certain key infrastructural choices in how the web and web apps are designed can have an order of magnitude’s difference to energy consumption and efficiency.

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In this episode I speak to Tom Greenwood, founder and CEO of Wholegrain Digital, a London-based WordPress agency who’s built a reputation and business around sustainable web design.

Wholegrain is itself a registered B Corp — meaning that they hold themselves accountable to balancing profit with purpose. Apart from talking through the company’s journey and experience of going through this process we also discuss what exactly is involved in creating a more sustainable website, and what personal and political actions we can all take to advance climate emergency solutions.

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Natalie is the co-founder and CEO of WildBit, a remote software company that produces tools for software developers. Natalie came across my radar after my interview with Peldi who suggested I reach out to her as somebody who might be interested in the topic.

He was right.

Because while she personally doesn’t have the time to learn about the issue deeply her company, like Hotjar, had made a commitment to becoming carbon neutral.

Besides discussing her personal views on the matter in the episode you’ll hear how this came about and how WildBit is approaching it.

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Frankly, if you work in software marketing or sales and haven’t heard of Steli Efti you’ve not been doing your job right. He’s an accomplished salesperson and negotiator who’s become deservedly famous for openly sharing his expertise for free.

I was lucky to work directly with Steli for a few months at Close but even so I was in two minds as to whether he’d be at all open to discussing this topic.

Turns out I was right to reach out to him. Like Peldi, despite not being an expert on the topic he is personally concerned and we had a fruitful conversation. More importantly (to me) he shared his thoughts on why and how activists in the area struggle with “selling” the problem and what approaches we can all take to do better.

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Simon Galbraith runs a twenty-year old software company called Redgate. I had the good fortune to work for Redgate, and directly with Simon, for a number of years. I don’t say “good fortune” lightly because Redgate was, and by all accounts still is, a great place to work. A lot of care is taken to provide genuine customer value and a safe and fulfilling environment for employees.

Unsurprisingly though, climate and sustainability haven’t featured highly on the company’s priority list. So I wanted to ask Simon why.

Simon is very direct in his views, which don’t always chime with mine or the mainstream climate views. But to me that’s all the more important in my journey to understand how tech can help with the climate emergency.

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Today’s guest is Mark Littlewood, CEO of the Business of Software conferences held in Boston, MA and Cambridge, UK.

I’ve known Mark for a number of years (and attended a few of his events) but, as is often the case with folks in tech, I don’t recall ever touching upon issues of climate or environment even in casual conversation.

With his birds-eye-view of the software industry Mark however proved to have a few important insights on how tech companies think about sustainability. We also discussed his personal views on the matter and, of course, what a conference organiser would want to see in a speaker to accept this kind of topic to a mainstream software event.

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My guest today is Peldi Guilizzoni, founder and CEO of Balsamiq, a remote software company headquartered in Bologna, Italy.

Peldi was one of the first people (like Rand) to accept my invitation to talk about the climate emergency from a tech point of view. If you’ve heard Peldi speak before about entrepreneurship and running a business you’ll know that he has some really useful (and occasionally controversial) viewpoints.

He does not disappoint. Words are not minced and his open and honest opinions were a pleasure to hear and discuss.

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In contrast to Rand and Bridget, I’ve known David for a very long time. But while we’ve worked together a lot we’ve rarely discussed environmental issues. So when I pinged him about this podcast I wasn’t sure what response I was going to get. As it happens, he said:

Perfect timing. We’ve just decided to make Hotjar carbon neutral.

Boom.

If you’ve heard David speak before you’ll know he has valuable advice to share about marketing and entrepreneurship.

But what does he think about the climate emergency?

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My guest today is Bridget Harris, CEO of You Can Book Me and former political adviser to the UK’s deputy Prime Minister.

In our conversation we discussed:

  • Bridget’s background as a senior political advisor
  • How she transitioned from that role to running a software company
  • The effectiveness and ethics of direct action (and Extinction Rebellion)
  • Climate problems as a tragedy of the commons (with examples)
  • Jeff Bezos vs. Bill Gates

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My first guest is Rand Fishkin, CEO of SparkToro and co-founder and former CEO of Moz. Huge thanks to Rand for agreeing to be on the show and, more importantly, for his insights.

In our conversation we discussed:

  • Rand’s new venture and what its about
  • His personal views on the climate emergency
  • The effectiveness of personal actions
  • Political and corporate responsibility
  • What actions Moz took to be greener
  • How companies and startups need to set themselves up with the right incentives
  • How Zebras are better than Unicorns

Resources

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