Show Notes

My guest today is Bridget Harris, CEO of You Can Book Me and former political adviser to the UK’s deputy Prime Minister.

In our conversation we discussed:

  • Bridget’s background as a senior political advisor
  • How she transitioned from that role to running a software company
  • The effectiveness and ethics of direct action (and Extinction Rebellion)
  • Climate problems as a tragedy of the commons (with examples)
  • Jeff Bezos vs. Bill Gates

Resources

Here are the direct links to resources mentioned in the episode:

Video Version

Show Notes

My first guest is Rand Fishkin, CEO of SparkToro and co-founder and former CEO of Moz. Huge thanks to Rand for agreeing to be on the show and, more importantly, for his insights.

In our conversation we discussed:

  • Rand’s new venture and what its about
  • His personal views on the climate emergency
  • The effectiveness of personal actions
  • Political and corporate responsibility
  • What actions Moz took to be greener
  • How companies and startups need to set themselves up with the right incentives
  • How Zebras are better than Unicorns

Resources

Here are the direct links to resources mentioned in the episode:

Video Version

In the final teaser before publishing full episodes I’m sharing the full guest list of the first fifteen episodes in Series 1.

The main call to action today is to subscribe to our mailing list.


Video Version


Episode Transcript

In today’s short teaser clip I’m sharing the names of the brave souls who joined me in Series 1 of tackling the tricky topic of climate change on the Fatal Error podcast.

You will hear from:

  1. Rand Fishkin of Moz and SparkToro
  2. Bridget Harris of YouCanBookMe
  3. Richard de Nys of AwardForce
  4. David Darmanin of Hotjar
  5. Gareth Marlow of EQ Systems
  6. Peldi Giulizzoni of Balsamiq
  7. James Christie of Sustainable UX
  8. Mark Littlewood of Business of Software
  9. Simon Galbraith of Redgate
  10. Oli Hall of Forge the Future
  11. Steli Efti of Close
  12. Natalie Nagele of WildBit
  13. Cennydd Bowles
  14. Tom Greenwood of Wholegrain Digital
  15. Jordyn Bonds of TallyLab

That’s it for today. Remember to subscribe at fatalerror.blog (or this channel) to catch the first episode.


In this second short teaser I discuss briefly how the idea came about, how I reached out to potential guests, and what the (surprise) reaction was.

The main call to action today is to subscribe to our mailing list.


Video Version


Episode Transcript

Hello, my name is Richard. Some of you know me as a designer, some maybe as a WordPress enthusiast, and quite a lot of you probably know me as a marketing person now. Today I’m talking about none of those things.

I’m starting to focus on something very different and what I’m gonna be doing in this short clip is just introducing a small side project I’ve been working on. And it’s about climate change and environmental responsibility with a particular focus on tech.

The reason I’m doing this, apart from me having a personal interest in the space, is that I’ve been kind of shocked and a bit worried at how little attention software companies seem to give to this topic. On the one hand, this is I guess not super surprising because for a software company it’s not a it’s not a core thing. But at the same time software companies are also notorious for being laggards, when it comes to societal or ethical issues. And and this tends to be varnished with the veneer of, “oh tech is a
good thing… tech is generally for good”.

So this is where my head was at the beginning of last year and I was wondering: maybe I was being too harsh. Is this really the case that software companies don’t care about climate justice and environmental responsibility or is there something else? Is it may be just too complicated an issue, is it overwhelming? So I started doing some research and in the process I reached out to a bunch of my contacts to try and, I suppose, to take a marketing approach to validate or refute my hypothesis. And well as a result of that is a series of interviews, which is in a sort of a podcast format, for which my guests have been very varied and provided some really good insights.

So it’s just a small intro today to that. Episodes will start going live soon. If you want to get heads up you can subscribe to the mailing list by visiting fatalerror.blog or else just follow our pages on social media sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

That’s it for today.

Thank you!


Today’s post is the first short teaser clip introducing my new podcast: Fatal Error. The topic is climate change with a particular focus on tech’s role and responsibility in the area.

The main call to action today is to subscribe to our mailing list.


Video Version


Episode Transcript

Hello, my name is Richard. Some of you know me as a designer, some maybe as a WordPress enthusiast, and quite a lot of you probably know me as a marketing person now.

Today I’m talking about none of those things. I’m starting to focus on something very different and what I’m gonna be doing in this short clip is just introducing a small side project I’ve been working on.

And it’s about climate change and environmental responsibility with a particular focus on tech. The reason I’m doing this, apart from me having a personal interest in the space, is that I’ve been kind of shocked and a bit worried at how little attention software companies seem to give to this topic.

On the one hand, this is I guess not super surprising because for a software company it’s not a it’s not a core thing. But at the same time software companies are also notorious for being laggards, when it comes to societal or ethical issues. And this tends to be varnished with the veneer of, “oh tech is a good thing… tech is generally for good”.

So this is where my head was at the beginning of last year and I was
wondering: maybe I was being too harsh. Is this really the case that software companies don’t care about climate justice and environmental
responsibility or is there something else? Is it may be just too complicated
an issue, is it overwhelming?

So I started doing some research and in the process I reached out to a bunch of my contacts to try and, I suppose, to take a
marketing approach to validate or refute my hypothesis. And well as a result of that is a series of interviews, which is in a sort of a podcast format, for which my guests have been very varied and provided some really good insights.

So it’s just a small intro today to that. Episodes will start going live soon. If you want to get heads up you can subscribe to the mailing list by visiting fatalerror.blog or else just follow our pages on social media sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

That’s it for today. Thank you!


Christmas is always a busy period in our household: apart from the obvious stuff, my daughter’s birthday is on the 9th of January which makes for an action-packed holiday season.

This year we got a double bill: we welcome our son Peter into the world in late-January and, as you might expect, bit the run-up to that as well as the time since then has been pretty intense.

So podcast production was paused while other production was in progress 🙂

Now we’re settling down and getting ready to ship the first installment of episodes.

I’ve had a fantastic response from various CEOs and practitioners. In the space of a couple of weeks we’ve recorded fifteen interviews with many more booked already.

We’ll be releasing Series 1 episodes (audio, transcript, and video where applicable) as soon as humanly possible.

In the meantime, here’s a sneak peek of the guests I’ve been lucky enough to speak with for Series 1:

  1. Rand Fishkin of Moz and SparkToro
  2. Bridget Harris of YouCanBookMe
  3. Richard de Nys of AwardForce
  4. David Darmanin of Hotjar
  5. Gareth Marlow of EQ Systems
  6. Peldi Giulizzoni of Balsamiq
  7. James Christie of Sustainable UX
  8. Mark Littlewood of Business of Software
  9. Simon Galbraith of Redgate
  10. Oli Hall of Forge the Future
  11. Steli Efti of Close
  12. Natalie Nagele of WildBit
  13. Cennydd Bowles
  14. Tom Greenwood of Wholegrain Digital
  15. Jordyn Bonds of TallyLab

Join our list to get episode notifications straight in your inbox.

I personally believe that the science is correct and that we are on the brink of a crisis. I am scared but I’m also optimistic, but unless we talk about it we’ll be stuck with the status quo. There’s no easy — or one — solution but we need to start somewhere. I’m starting with kick-starting a conversation in the industry I know best.

It doesn’t matter what your view on the issue is. You’re welcome to listen, share, and argue.

We are not accepting or soliciting advertising and episode sponsorship. We accept donations for the running costs of the show and we will be open about what we receive.